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1962 Scootacar Mk II

1962 Scootacar Mk II

Description

1962 Scootacar Mk II

Curiously, a locomotive builder, the Hunslet Engine Works, decided to produce a small car. Apparently the wife of one of the directors wanted a car that was easier to park than her Jaguar. Henry Brown – designer of the tiny Rodley car – designed the unorthodox shape by sitting atop a Villiers engine while an assistant drew a chalk outline around him.

The Mark I was essentially a low, stable, platform frame with the driver and passenger straddling a bench scooter-style. The strange, angelfish-like shape was made of fiberglass, but the two halves were joined vertically down the center. With a large door on the left side, and one of the largest parcel shelves in the industry, this Scootacar was quite roomy. Despite the five-foot height (it was named "the telephone booth" as many were finished in red), the little car handled extremely well.

In 1959, it was decided there was a need for a more refined model. Rather than opting for a few minor changes, Scootacar came up with the Mark II, totally redesigned from stem to stern, with a larger body shell incorporating a sort of tail. The motor now lived under a large, plush, angled rear bench, while the driver sat on a proper chair, which tipped forward. While a very sound car, it appeared to late for substantial sales.

In 1961, a 250 cc twin has fitted to about 50 cars, but few customers were willing to brave the 62 mph white-knuckle ride.

Manufacturer: Hunslet Engine Works, Leeds, England

Click here for more info




This vehicle was one of the many vehicles sold at the Bruce Weiner Microcar Museum Auction in February 2013

Click here to review the auction results in the Market Watch Section of Harry Kraemer's Wheels & Wings site

Detailed Information
Detailed Description
1962 Scootacar Mk II

Additional Information

Additional Information

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