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1953 Fuldamobil N-2

1953 Fuldamobil N-2

Description

1953 Fuldamobil N-2

The amusingly rotund Fuldamobil qualifies as probably the longest-built microcar. However, in its near-twenty year production run, a mere three thousand examples were built. Nor was the production of small vehicles a prime focus for the company, which produced electrical devices, and was a distributor for Bosch.

Immediately after the war, director Carl Schmitt employed freelance designer Norbert Stevenson to design his concept for a microcar. The earliest prototypes, with their flat angular shapes were not unlike miniature trailer caravans, but were built on heavy tube frames featuring technically interesting center point steering. A glider company made the heavy, solid body work of wood. These Type N models were covered in vinyl and utilized a Baker & Polling chainsaw motor.

The search for a more suitable motor continued, and the Fichtel & Sachs 360cc stationary engine enabled the new Type N-2 to finally hit 80 kph. The wooden body work was now covered with a distinctive hammered aluminum sheet, prompting the nickname "Silver Flea". A smooth aluminum painted finish was also available. The heavy, well-detailed body work, similar to good furniture construction with thick, sliding glass windows, was very labour intensive. The nickname, soft ride, and roomy cabin brought market success, and designer Norbert Stevenson set about reducing the extensive hand-fabrication costs. This he achieved with the S-series, which utilized a large, bulbous, aluminum body shell.

This rare, well-known vehicle came from a museum in Germany.

Manufacturer: Elektromaschinenbau Fulda Germany

Click here for more info




This was one of the vehicles sold at the Bruce Weiner Microcar Auction in February 2013. Website owner Harry Kraemer has all of the sale data from that auction in his Market Watch section of his Wheels & Wings site Flymall.org. See link below for the data.

Click here for auction sale report

Detailed Information
Detailed Description
1953 Fuldamobil N-2

Additional Information

Additional Information

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